Workshops


We will make resources from workshops available here. Currently, we have recordings and information from two recent iDigBio workshops: Paleo Imaging & Collections in the 21st Century.

 

iDigBio Paleo Imaging Workshop

iDigBio in collaboration with the Jackson School of Geosciences and its High Resolution X­-ray CT Facility at the University of Texas co­-sponsored a workshop focused on imaging solutions for paleontological specimens and research. The target audience included collections managers, curators, and researchers in vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, paleobotany, and micropaleontology, but is equally relevant to serious amateur paleontologists.

Workshop Wiki: More details about the workshop, in addition to links to many of the resources and websites referred to during the event.

Agenda- Day 1: Talk titles and approximate times for the workshop.

 

Workshop Recordings: Day 1:

8:00 am-10:00 am: Scanning technology: Tim Rowe (U. of Texas-Austin), Talia Karim (U. Colorado) & Una Farrell (U. Kansas), Suzanne Strait (Marshall U.), Aaron Wood (U. of Florida), & John Kappelman (U. of Texas-Austin).

10:20 am-12:20 pm: Imaging techniques: Roger Burkhalter (U. Oklahoma), Christina Byrd (Virginia Mus. of Nat. Hist.), Paul Mayer (Field Mus.), Dan Miller (U. Michigan), Maribeth Price (S.D. School of Mines and Tech.), and Chelsea Graham (Yale U.).

1:30 pm-3:15 pm: 3D digitization and printing: Nick Pyenson (Smithsonian), Richard Urban (Florida State U.), Franek Hasiuk (Iowa State U.), and Dana Ehret (U. Alabama).

3:30 pm-5:00 pm: Open access and downstream audiences: Bruce MacFadden (U. Florida), Alix Vance (GeoScienceWorld), and Ann Molineux (U. Texas-Austin).

Twitter feed for Workshop #palpix

 

 

iDigBio Collections in the 21st Century

Collections for the 21st Century Symposium

Monday, May 5, 2014 8:45 AM EDT – Tuesday, May 6, 2014 12:00 PM EDT

On May 5-6, 2014, iDigBio, in conjunction with the NSC Alliance, presented a symposium themed ‘Collections for the 21st Century’. The symposium emphasized the value of collections data in meeting challenges facing biodiversity and human societies. Digitization of Bio-Specimens has brought a tremendous amount of data on-line for new and exciting uses in research and education. But we as scientists need to take the initiative and demonstrate ways in which the data is being used now, so that policy makers and administrators will provide ongoing support. Digitized data are valuable only if it is widely known as useful.

The symposium demonstrated the value of biodiversity, and our natural history collections, to policy makers, administrators and others who use collections data and impact the levels of support for collections. The symposium featured a full day of talks on May 5 and a half-day of talks on May 6. Topics of discussion included uses of taxonomic, spatial, and temporal data on biodiversity to address big-science questions related to human health, climate change, food security, and related issues, as well as more fundamental investigations related to understanding and protecting biodiversity.

Recordings are now available from iDigBio and linked below. Of course, if you have time, you should watch and enjoy all of these talks. However, the following talks may be of particular interest to FOSSIL participants and all those interested in paleontology: Scott Miller: Why We Have Natural History Collections; Jessica Maisano: An Overview of High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (HRXCT) Data Acquisition and Applications; Dena Smith: A Deep-Time Approach to Studying Environmental Change; Vincent S. Smith: No Specimen Left Behind: Collections Digitisation at the Natural History Museum, London; Scott Edwards: Opportunities and Challenges for Funding and Sustaining Natural History Collections; Bruce MacFadden:Fossils in the Cloud: Advancing the Broader Impacts of iDigBio; Gil Nelson: Empowering the Collections Community and Broadening Diversity in Biodiversity Science.

Recordings:

May 5:

8:45-10:30

Larry Page: Welcome and introductions pdf

Scott Miller, Smithsonian Institution: Why We Have Natural History Collections pdf

Greg Riccardi, Florida State University: NIBA, ADBC and iDigBio: Transforming the Landscape pdf

Pamela S. Soltis, Florida Museum of Natural History: Phylogenetics and Linking Molecular Data with Collections pdf

11:00-12:00

Edwin Scholes, Cornell Lab of Ornithology: The Extended Specimen: Using Media Specimens for Collections-based Ornithological Research pdf

Jessica A. Maisano, University of Texas at Austin: An Overview of High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (HRXCT) Data Acquisition and Applications

1:30-3:00

Dena M. Smith, University of Colorado: A Deep-Time Approach to Studying Environmental Change pdf

Jason Knouft, Saint Louis University: Climate Change, Hydrology, and Aquatic Species Distributions pdf

Neil S. Cobb, Northern Arizona University, Katja Seltmann, AMNH, and Nico Franz, Arizona State University: The Current State of Arthropod Biodiversity Data to Address Impacts of Global Change pdf

3:30-5:00

Dora Canhos, Centro de Referência em Informação Ambiental, Brazil: SpeciesLink Network: Tools and Services to Support E-science and Policy-making pdf

Vincent S. Smith, The Natural History Museum, London, UK: No Specimen Left Behind: Collections Digitisation at the Natural History Museum, London pdf

Joanne Daly, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia: Collections – From Local to Global – Building Strength in an Interconnected Digital World pdf

May 6:

8:30-10:00

Scott Edwards, U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF): Opportunities and Challenges for Funding and Sustaining Natural History Collections;

Joseph A. Cook, University of New Mexico: Building Critical Scientific Infrastructure for Key Societal Issues;

Bruce J. MacFadden, Florida Museum of Natural History: Fossils in the Cloud: Advancing the Broader Impacts of iDigBio

10:30-12:00

Anna K. Monfils, Central Michigan University, and Shari Ellis, Florida Museum of Natural History: Students Working in Natural History Collections – What is the Impact?;

Gil Nelson, Florida State University: Empowering the Collections Community and Broadening Diversity in Biodiversity Science;

Robert Guralnick, University of Colorado: From Biocollections to Global Change Biology: New Conceptual and Cyberinfrastructure Frameworks For Closing The Gap

 

Twitter feed for Workshop #iDigBioCollections21