Peer-reviewed paper – Seeking shared practice: A juxtaposition of the attributes and activities of organized fossil groups with those of professional paleontology

Check out the newest peer-reviewed article written by members of the FOSSIL Project team!  Download the PDF here: Crippen et al., 2016

Abstract:

This study sought to define the attributes and practices of organized fossil groups (e.g., clubs, paleontological societies) as amateur paleontologists, as well as those of professional paleontologists, and explore the potential for these two groups to work collaboratively as a formalized community. Such an investigation is necessary to develop design principles for an online environment that supports this community and encourages communication and shared practice among individuals with different backgrounds in paleontology and who are geographically isolated. A national survey of fossil group representatives and professional paleontologists was used to address the research questions. The results provide a rich description of the attributes and activities of both groups and are discussed in terms of three design principles for supporting the two groups in a form of collaboration and fellowship via a coherent shared practice within an online learning community.

Peer-reviewed paper: Amateur paleontological societies and fossil clubs, interactions with professional paleontologists, and social paleontology in the United States

Check out the first peer-reviewed publication to result from the FOSSIL Project!  This article, published by the journal Palaeontologia Electronica, is open-access and freely available to readers.  Click here to get the PDF.

2016 SEGSA Photos

Enjoy these photos from the FOSSIL theme sessions at the 2016 Southeastern Section regional meeting of the Geological Society of America in Columbia, SC!

DSCF4807

Cynthia Crane, director of the Aurora Fossil Museum, and Linda McCall, president of the North Carolina Fossil Club, waiting patiently for the morning talks to start

Ben Dattilo talk SEGSA1

Dr. Ben Dattilo giving his talk on why amateur/avocational paleontologists are crucial to the field of paleontology

Ben Dattilo talk SEGSA2

Dr. Ben Dattilo giving his talk on why amateur/avocational paleontologists are crucial to the field of paleontology

Bobby Boessenecker talk SEGSA

Dr. Bobby Boessenecker speaking about the contributions of amateur paleontologists in California

Chuck Ferrara talk SEGSA1

Chuck Ferrara, president of the Southwest Florida Fossil Society, speaking about the society’s contributions to science

Chuck Ferrara talk SEGSA2

Chuck Ferrara, president of the Southwest Florida Fossil Society, speaking about the society’s contributions to science

Cindy Lockner and Bonnie Cronin poster SEGSA

Cindy Lockner and Bonnie Cronin of the Florida Fossil Hunters present their poster on FFH’s paleontology outreach and educational endeavors

Cynthia Crane talk SEGSA1

Cynthia Crane, director of the Aurora Fossil Museum, presenting a talk about the role of the museum in the paleontological community

Cynthia Crane talk SEGSA2

Cynthia Crane, director of the Aurora Fossil Museum, presenting a talk about the role of the museum in the paleontological community

Dana Ehret talk SEGSA1

Dr. Dana Ehret giving a talk on the role of amateur/avocational paleontologists in preserving and studying the Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site in Alabama

Dana Ehret talk SEGSA2

Dr. Dana Ehret giving a talk on the role of amateur/avocational paleontologists in preserving and studying the Steven C. Minkin Paleozoic Footprint Site in Alabama

FOSSIL session luncheon1

FOSSIL theme session luncheon

FOSSIL session luncheon2

FOSSIL theme session luncheon

luncheon

FOSSIL theme session luncheon

George Powell Jr poster SEGSA

George Powell, Jr. presenting a poster on his work to preserve and display an associated section of whale vertebrae and ribs from the Lee Creek Mine in Aurora, NC

exhibit hall

Chuck Ferrara, Lee Cone, and Walter Stein exploring the exhibit/poster hall

Lee Cone talk SEGSA

Lee Cone, president of the Special Friends of the Aurora Fossil Museum club, giving a talk on the contributions of the Friends group to the museum and the field of paleontology in general

Linda McCall talk SEGSA

Linda McCall, president of the North Carolina Fossil Club, presenting a talk on the importance of amateur/avocational paleontologists to the field of paleontology

w.stein segsa1

Walter Stein, owner/operator of PaleoAdventures Inc, presenting a talk about the role that ethical commercial paleontologists play in the world of paleontology

FPS Russell & Paul

Russell Brown of the Florida Fossil Hunters and Paul Roth of the Florida Paleontological Society present their poster on working with the National Park Service on Junior Paleontologist Kits

Paul Roth poster SEGSA

Paul Roth, president of the Florida Paleontological Society, speaks to conference goers about working with the National Park Service in creating Junior Paleontologist Kits for parks around the country

Russell Brown poster SEGSA1

Russell Brown, president of the Florida Fossil Hunters, engages with conference goers in front of his poster (co-authored with Paul Roth)

Russell Brown poster SEGSA2

Russell Brown, president of the Florida Fossil Hunters, engages with conference goers in front of his poster (co-authored with Paul Roth)

kowinsky-segsa

Jayson Kowinsky, a.k.a. The Fossil Guy, speaking about the importance of fact-checked amateur paleontology websites in educating the public about the earth sciences

Steve Fields talk SEGSA1

Dr. Steve Fields from the Culture and Heritage Museums in Rock Hill, SC, presenting his idea for a new exhibit on the Pleistocene of South Carolina

Steve Fields talk SEGSA2

Dr. Steve Fields from the Culture and Heritage Museums in Rock Hill, SC, presenting his idea for a new exhibit on the Pleistocene of South Carolina

Formative Evaluation of myFOSSIL Website

This report contains the results of a formative evaluation study on the myFOSSIL website, conducted in July 2014. This was completed by an external evaluation group (Audience Viewpoints Consulting, Inc.). Questions about this or later iterations of evaluation should be directed to the FOSSIL Project’s external evaluator, Kate Haley Goldman, at [email protected]

Fossil Web Survey report 07.23.14 FINAL

Paper: Using Fossil Teeth to Study the Evolution of Horses in Response to a Changing Climate

♦ SUMMARY: This paper, co-authored by UF Curriculum and Instruction PhD student Julie Bokor (@jbokor) and two high school biology teachers, Jennifer Broo (@jbroo) and Jessica Mahoney, was published in the February 2016 volume of the journal The American Biology Teacher.  The abstract is provided below; please click on the link to read the full paper.

Abstract: Students measure and sketch physical characteristics of 15 fossilized horse teeth.  Each student group creates a graph that summarizes the trend between age of the fossil and length of the tooth.  Plant information cards summarizing the flora of each epoch and guided analysis questions allow students to develop an explanation for the change in horse teeth in response to plant evolution due to a changing climate.

♦ AUDIENCE: 9-12, High School, Ninth (9th) Grade, Tenth (10th) Grade, Eleventh (11th) Grade, Twelfth (12th) Grade

♦ TOPICS/THEMES: Scientific Method, Measurement, Paleoclimate, Paleoenvironment, Paleontology, Fossils, Cenozoic, Horses, Teeth, Environment, Climate, Flora, Paleobotany, Ecology

♦ INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the link below to access the paper. Please contact the author with any questions.

Bokor et al 2016 Using Fossil Teeth to Study the Evolution of Horses in Response to a Changing Climate

Educational Outreach Materials

These resources have been created by fossil clubs across the U.S. for outreach purposes.  Before using any of these resources, please contact the indicated point-person for permission.

Want to see your club’s materials on this page?  Just contact the myFOSSIL webmaster @egardner!

 

Contributions by the Paleontological Society of Austin:

Point-person: Mike Smith, @msmith

These 2’x3′ posters are shareable under the Creative Commons BY-SA license (i.e., attribution must be given and any derived use must be share-alike).

  1. Mesozoic Oceans: PosterOverviewFinalNew
  2. Plesiosaurs: PosterPlesiosaurFinalLightNew
  3. Mosasaurs: PosterMosasaurFinalLightNew
  4. Ichthyosaurs: PosterIchthyosaurFinalLightNew

Resource: Digital Atlas of Ordovician Life: Resources for Teachers

♦ SUMMARY: Check out this fantastic set of resources for teaching paleontology in K-12 classrooms! Students can examine the ancient oceans of Ohio, investigate ecosystem dynamics using fossils from the Cincinnati Arch, and explore geologic time. More resources are coming soon. Thanks to Dr. Alycia Stigall (@alycia-stigall) for providing the link to this site.

♦ AUDIENCE: K-12, Elementary School, Middle School, High School, Kindergarten, First (1st) Grade, Second (2nd) Grade, Third (3rd) Grade, Fourth (4th) Grade, Fifth (5th) Grade, Sixth (6th) Grade, Seventh (7th) Grade, Eighth (8th) Grade, Ninth (9th) Grade, Tenth (10th) Grade, Eleventh (11th) Grade, Twelfth (12th) Grade

♦ TOPICS/THEMES: Database, Paleontology, Fossils, Ordovician, Paleozoic, Ecology, Ohio, Geology, Geologic Time, Biology

♦ INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the link below to access this resource. Please contact the author with any questions.

http://www.ordovicianatlas.org/resources-for-teachers/

Cincinnati Mini Conference on Paleontology

The FOSSIL Project and the Dry Dredgers along with our partners, the Cincinnati Museum Center (CMC) and the Paleontological Society (PS), are excited to be holding a joint mini conference on paleontology for the Cincinnati, OH, area on June 3-5, 2016!

new logo

Follow the links for detailed information:

myfossil-logo    dry dredgers   CMC logo  ps logo

Registration

All attendees must pre-register by the extended deadline of May 18, 2016. Please do so by filling out this registration form.

There is NO registration fee to participate in this mini conference.

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Travel & Lodging Info

Participants are responsible for their own travel costs (e.g., flying or driving to Cincinnati), lodging, and meals other than provided lunches.

A block of rooms is being held at the Radisson Hotel-Cincinnati Riverfront for the nights of June 2, 3, & 4 at a rate of $149 per night; please call 1-(859)-491-1200 and mention the FOSSIL Project to reserve a room.  To get the special rate, you must reserve your room before Friday, May 6.

Note that traffic in Cincinnati can be very frustrating.  For the weekend of June 3-5, in addition to our mini conference, the Bunbury Music Festival will be taking place; thousands of festival-goers will be in town for this event.  Additionally, the Cincinnati Reds baseball team has home games scheduled for Friday night, Saturday afternoon, and Sunday afternoon.

Therefore, please plan ahead for traffic delays, congestion, and longer wait times at restaurants. Your understanding is appreciated as these other events are outside of our control.

 

 

Schedule of Events & Field Trip Plans

For this mini conference, we have planned two field trips to iconic Cincinnati Arch geology locations; a keynote talk by Dr. Tony Martin; presentations by Dr. Carlton Brett, Dr. Alycia Stigall, and Dry Dredgers President Jack Kallmeyer; a poster session; breakout sessions; and a townhall discussion with officers of the Paleontological Society about how amateur/avocational paleontologists can become an integral part of their organization.

For further detail, please click the corresponding links:

 

Pre-Conference Field Trip to Big Bone Lick State Park

THURSDAY, JUNE 2ND @ 2pm – 5pm, meet at Big Bone Lick State Park

An optional pre-conference field trip to Big Bone Lick State Park, the birthplace of North American vertebrate paleontology, will take place on June 2nd.  Glenn Storrs, curator at the Cincinnati Museum Center, will lead the Big Bone Lick tour starting at 2pm, so don’t be late!  Meet in the Visitor Center at the park (Union, KY).  Transportation is on your own — if you need a ride, please refer to the confirmation email sent out on May 4 which contains a list of folks offering rides.  Please contact Jack Kallmeyer with any questions about this trip.

 

Mini Conference Field Trip #1

FRIDAY, JUNE 3RD @ 6am – 4pm, meet at Radisson Hotel

Field trip to eastern half of Cincinnati Arch:

6:00 – 6:30 AM – Coffee & donuts in front of the Radisson hotel; arrange carpool groups

6:30 – 6:40 AM – Everybody drives to the Kroger on Dixie Highway so that van riders and non-driving carpoolers can park their vehicles for free!

Kroger address: 2150 Dixie Highway, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017

[click map for Google driving directions]

kroger map

6:40 – 8:00AM – Drive to Maysville, KY. [1:00 – 1:30 drive time]

8:00 – 10:30AM – Stop 1: Roadcut exposing the Kope, Fairview, and Bellevue Formations [2:30 time spent]

10:30 – 11:00AM – Drive to lunch area [0:15 – 0:30 drive time]

11:00AM – 12:00PM – Subway lunch [1:00 eat time]

12:00 – 12:30PM – Drive to the vicinity of Flemingsburg, KY [0:30 drive time]

12:30 – 2:30PM – Stop 2: Roadcut exposing the Grant Lake Formation [2:00 time spent]

2:30 – 4:00PM – Drive back to Covington, KY [1:30 drive time]

 

Keynote Talk

FRIDAY, JUNE 3RD @ 7pm, meet in Reikert Auditorium within CMC’s Union Terminal

Dr. Tony Martin of Emory University in Atlanta, GA, will be our keynote speaker on the evening of Friday, June 3.  The lecture will be open to the public, and will take place in the Reikert Auditorium within the Cincinnati Museum Center’s Union Terminal.  The title of Tony’s talk is “Tracing our way to discovery: cooperation between professional and amateur paleontologists in ichnology and more.”  See more details about the talk on the CMC website.

Please note:

-This evening is also the museum’s designated “Free Friday” event, so there will be crowds!  If at all possible, please plan to carpool and arrive a bit early.

-A parking fee of $5-$10 per car will be in effect on Friday evening at Union Terminal.

-Once you arrive, enter the Union Terminal rotunda and tell a greeter that you are here for the Insights Lecture. You will then be shown the way to the auditorium.

-After the lecture, we will tour the museum’s Ordovician Hall. [Please be patient as we will have to negotiate the crowds.]

 

 

Saturday Events

SATURDAY, JUNE 4TH @ 8:30am – 8:30pm, meet at CMC’s Geier Collections & Research Center

8:30 – 9:00AM – Check-in and coffee & donuts; hang posters in Lower Hall

9:00AM – Welcome & Introduction

9:15AM – Dr. Carl Brett’s talk on the Kope through Maysville Formations

10:00AM – Dr. Alycia Stigall’s talk on the Richmondian Stage

10:45AM – Break

11:00AM – Jack Kallmeyer’s talk on a new crinoid species, Glyptocrinus nodosus

11:45AM – Pizza lunch & poster presentations

NOTE: Poster session will take place in the Lower Hall. No food or drink allowed in this area!

1:00 – 2:30PM – Collections tours

2:30 – 4:30PM – Breakout sessions

SESSION 1: Incorporating paleontology into K-12 education

Leaders: Drs. Alycia Stigall & Christina O’Malley

Lesson planning brainstorming session

SESSION 2: eMuseum brainstorming & community feedback

Leaders: Drs. Bruce MacFadden & Ronny Leder

SESSION 3: Biostratinomy and Taphonomy

Leaders: Drs. Ben Dattilo & Carl Brett

4:30 – 4:45PM – Report back to entire group on breakout session discussions

4:45 – 5:00PM – Break

5:00 – 7:00PM – Break for dinner [BBQ Dinner at Geier Center; cost is $20 cash per person]

7:00 – 8:00PM – Townhall meeting with Paleontological Society officers

8:00 – 8:30PM – Wrap Up & Concluding Comments

 

Mini Conference Field Trip #2

SUNDAY, JUNE 5TH @ 6am – 5pm, meet at Radisson Hotel

Field trip to western half of Cincinnati Arch:

6:00 – 6:30 AM – Coffee & donuts in front of the Radisson hotel; arrange carpool groups

6:30 – 6:40 AM – Everybody drives to the Kroger on Dixie Highway so that van riders and non-driving carpoolers can park their vehicles for free!

Kroger address: 2150 Dixie Highway, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017

[click map for Google driving directions]

kroger map

6:40 – 7:30AM – Drive to Vevay, IN [1:00 drive time]

7:30 – 10:00AM – Stop 1: Roadcut(s) exposing Maysvillian strata [2:30 stop time]

10:00 – 10:30AM – Drive to Madison, IN [0:30 drive time]

10:30AM – 12:00PM – Stop 2: Roadcut exposing Richmondian and Silurian strata [1:30 stop time]

12:00 – 1:00 – Riverfront lunch in Madison, IN [1:00 eat time]

1:00 – 02:00 – Drive to Saint Leon, IN [1:00 drive time]

2:00 – 4:30PM – Stop 3: Roadcut exposing Richmondian strata [2:30 stop time]

4:30 – 5:30PM – Drive back to Covington, KY [0:45 – 1:00 drive time]

 

 

Field Trip Considerations

Transportation

We have four 12-passenger vans, with approximately 40 seats available, for use on the field trips. We don’t want to waste space in the rented vans; therefore, if not all seats are filled, we may ask you to park your car and ride with us in the vans.

We have a strict limit on the number of additional cars that may trail the vans during the field trips!  Only 5 additional cars are permitted to follow the vans on Friday and on Sunday. CARPOOLING WILL BE NECESSARY. Please plan accordingly.

Important Notes

– A certain amount of climbing / crawling will be required.

– Collecting will NOT require digging; everything is surface-collected.

– Fossils in these areas are relatively small, so patience and persistence are virtues!

– Exposures will be at roadcuts, so traffic may be problematic when crossing highways and other roads.

– Rocks can be loose & sharp; please be aware of rock falls and other hazards.

– These trips will run rain or shine! If it rains, that means muddy and slippery conditions.

– Baggies for collecting will be provided.

– First aid kits will be available, as well as several CPR/First Aid certified folks in case of emergency.

– Parents are responsible for child safety during the trips.

What to Bring

– After the Friday field trip, many folks won’t have the opportunity to get showered/cleaned up before heading to dinner and the keynote talk that evening.  We highly recommend that you bring a backpack with a change of clothes, deodorant, etc., for quick clean up in a restroom!

– Must Haves: Water bottle; hat; sunblock; rain gear (poncho or rain coat); field notebook OR paper & pencil; work gloves (garden gloves are fine); hand lens

– Additional helpful accessories: Safety glasses; GPS unit; knee pads; sturdy boots; rock hammer (as a climbing aid); safety whistle; permanent marker for labeling collection baggies

Food

– Lunch will be provided on the field trips (Subway sandwiches).

– If you indicated that you would bring your own lunch on the field trips, don’t forget to bring it!

– We will have some other snacks available: fruit, granola bars, etc.

– Vegetarian and other food needs MUST have been indicated on the registration form.

 

Notes for university students and K-12 educator attendees

Through sponsorship from the Paleontological Society, we are glad to be providing travel scholarships for five university paleontology students and five K-12 educators.  The ten travel scholarship recipients were selected from over twenty applications that were received by the deadline of April 6.

– Students are expected to present a poster on their paleontological research or interests.  Educators and other conference attendees are welcome to present posters as well.

– K-12 educators are expected to participate in the K-12 breakout session on Saturday afternoon (see schedule above).

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Regarding the poster presentations:

– Posters can be up to 3×4 ft. in size

– Projects are up to the presenter, as long as it pertains to your area of paleontological research/interest

– Posters should include a title, authors, institutional affiliations, as well as the following sections where applicable – introduction, methods, results, discussion, any literature cited, and acknowledgements

– Posters need to be broadly accessible to a wide audience of professionals, amateurs, students, K-12 teachers, and interested public

– Posters will need to be up by 9am on Saturday, June 4, and come down before 6pm that day

– Presenters should be at their posters to answer questions during the lunch hour on Saturday (11:45am – 1:00pm)

The poster session will take place in the Lower Hall of the Geier Collections & Research Center. Note that no food or drinks are allowed in this area.

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Maps & Nearby Restaurants

Although not everyone is staying at the Radisson Cincinnati Riverfront hotel, it is our “home base” for the mini-conference and therefore the reference point for directions.  The hotel’s address is 668 West 5th St., Covington, KY, 41011.  Below are a series of maps and other travel-related info that you might find useful.

Directions – Parking for field trip days

For Friday’s and Sunday’s field trips, you need to meet us at the Radisson hotel and then we will all drive to the Kroger on Dixie Highway to park the van rider and non-driving carpooler vehicles for free.

Kroger address: 2150 Dixie Highway, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017

[click map for Google driving directions]

kroger map

Directions – Radisson hotel to CMC’s Union Terminal

For Friday night’s lecture, you need to go to the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal.

[click map for Google directions]

fri directions

Directions – Radisson hotel to CMC’s Geier Collections & Research Center

For Saturday’s events, you need to go to the Cincinnati Museum Center’s research/collections building which is off from the Union Terminal campus.

[click map for Google directions]

geier directions

Map of Nearby Restaurants

Please note that, due to safety concerns, it is NOT recommended that you walk around downtown Cincinnati in search of restaurants.

[click map for Google listing]

restaurants map

Public Transportation

Both Covington, KY, and Cincinnati, OH, offer public transportation.  Please refer to the links below for more details.

Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky

Southwest Ohio Metro

 

 

Contacts

Questions or concerns?

Please email the FOSSIL Project Coordinator, Eleanor Gardner, at [email protected]

or

President of the Dry Dredgers, Jack Kallmeyer, at [email protected]

Paper: Science in K-5

♦ SUMMARY: Science traditionally has been underrepresented in K-5 teaching and learning. The reasons for this are multifaceted, including emphasis on core skills of reading, writing, and math learning, but also the lack of teachers with appropriate science training. With the changing national standards – especially NGSS – science is gaining traction in K-5. The attached report, which covers K-8, is published by the National Academy of Science.

♦ AUDIENCE: K-8, Elementary School, Middle School, Kindergarten, First (1st) Grade, Second (2nd) Grade, Third (3rd) Grade, Fourth (4th) Grade, Fifth (5th) Grade, Sixth (6th) Grade, Seventh (7th) Grade, Eighth (8th) Grade, Teachers

♦ TOPICS/THEMES: STEM, Science, Education Politics

♦ INSTRUCTIONS: Click on the link below to access the poster of the lesson. Please contact the author with any questions.

NAS K8 education