Variety of fossils

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  MacKenzie Smith 12 months ago.

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  • #40292

    Jenny Tibbetts
    Participant

    I got permission from my Tooele County to collect and study some of the rocks and fossils on county land in the Oquirrh Mountains (Utah). I’m an environmental science major soon to enter graduate school, not a geologist. So I like to study and collect rocks more as a hobby. The fossils I collect are from 2 separate canyons. The 1st site is high up in elevation on a limestone shale cliff face.┬áThis post consists of fossils found at the 1st canyon site. I will post pictures from the 2nd site on a seperate post. I’m trying to ID the fossils, although I have a pretty good idea on what some of them are. I’d appreciate any comments you may have.

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    #40661

    Victor Perez
    Keymaster

    It looks like you’ve got some fenestrate bryozoans and some horn corals. I’m not sure what you’ve got in the second photo, perhaps some kind of worm trace fossil.

     

    Best,

    Victor

    #40717

    Timothy Carroll
    Participant

    Hi Jenny! What’s the age of these? That first one looks like one of the syringoporid or syringophyllid tabulates… probably the latter since it doesn’t appear to have those tubes(stolons?) that connect the corallites

    #40763

    MacKenzie Smith
    Participant

    Here is some info from the USGS on the area. There is a list of fossils from there too. https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0629a/report.pdf

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