Bill Heimbrock

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Jack, on your Causeway Road bivalve without an ID (very nice specimen BTW), I would suggest it’s Rhytimya sp. There is a similar specimen from the Fairmount pictured in “Review of Ordovician Pelecypods”, Pojeta, Plate 16, figure 10. That one is R. mickelboroughi (Whitfield). But your Waynesville or Liberty specimen is probably R. faberi (Miller), which is found in the Richmondian. Check Dalve 1948 to see if there is a picture of this species.

    • Bill,

      I looked at the Ohio Geological Survey VII and there are quite a few Rhytimya sp. I think you are correct with your ID. Thanks. Dalve 1948 is not illustrated. What publication and year is the Pope reference?

  • 2 months, 3 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Well, the C5 sequence has an abundant number of Treptoceras duseri. This is an orthocone nautiloid that fits your description and photo. Identification from internal molds like this is not foolproof. Using a photo is even harder. Try having a browse of publication USGS 1066-P and compare photos to your specimen. Here’s a link to the downloadable PDF. https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/pp1066P

  • 3 months ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Jack, you are thinking of Geniculograptus typicalis. Here’s a close-up photo of another 3D specimen from our website. http://www.drydredgers.org/fieldtrips/trip200410/large/grapto3.jpg

    • Yup! That’s it. With all the different species of graptolites in the Cincinnatian, this is the only one I ever seem to find.

  • 3 months, 3 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    There was a point in time when the contents of this book was all I knew about the fossils of Cincinnati Ohio, despite living here all my life. This elementary guide is often the starting point for Cincinnati fossil hunters in obtaining vast knowledge from an growing interest in fossils fueled by the good illustrations, identification keys and excellent descriptions found in “Cincinnati Fossils”. The question is – will we see a current edition or subsequent edition ever again published and sold in a retail store?

  • 4 months, 1 week ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Tom, if you haven’t already, be sure to reach out to the North Coast Fossil Club. (http://www.ncfclub.org/) They may know of some fossil localities near Toledo.

  • 4 months, 2 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Yes he did. Ian emailed me a photo of it. Thanks for following up, Jen.

  • 5 months, 2 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock's profile was updated
  • 5 months, 2 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Hi Ian. @ian-forsythe
    I failed to find your poster on Sunday at GSA. I was looking forward to seeing it. I was thinking it was going to be shown on Tuesday. Is there any way I can read it? You can reach me at [email protected] Thanks!

  • 5 months, 2 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    That orthocone nautiloid looks fairly complete end-to-end. I think the wide end looks like part of the living chamber. The smaller, perpendicular specimen is likely to be from a separate animal. That’s a beautiful specimen, Ian. It’s a keeper.

  • 6 months, 1 week ago

    This is now resolved. See you all at GSA 2018 in Indy!

  • 6 months, 4 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    I was trying out the new MyFossil Android App with this post from my back yard. I was trying to say in my post that “If you live in Cincinnati Ohio, fossil hunting is as easy as stepping out your back door. It becomes more of a matter of trying to find the best fossil.”
    After I entered this text I hit the photo icon to take a picture of a rock in my yard. Above is the rock and caption. Somehow the text I first entered was lost, so I’m adding it here as a comment.

  • 6 months, 4 weeks ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted an image in the group Cincinnatian Collectors from the myFOSSIL app

    A rock in my back yard in Cincinnati

    • I was trying out the new MyFossil Android App with this post from my back yard. I was trying to say in my post that “If you live in Cincinnati Ohio, fossil hunting is as easy as stepping out your back door. It becomes more of a matter of trying to find the best fossil.”
      After I entered this text I hit the photo icon to take a picture of a rock in my yard. Above is the rock and caption. Somehow the text I first entered was lost, so I’m adding it here as a comment.

  • 6 months, 4 weeks ago
  • 7 months ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    My apologies for not replying sooner. No reply for me means “I don’t know”. At times, these two were thought to be synonymous. I think that Treptoceras is more common and has a wider range. I’ll have to look dig into some siphuncle photos and see if I can tell the difference. Thanks for asking! @jbauer@matthew-croxton

  • 7 months ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Correction to my previous post. The bryozoan at http://www.drydredgers.org/fieldtrips/trip201505/large/P6040087.JPG is a Constellaria. Not a Conularia. Big difference. My appologies.

  • 7 months, 3 weeks ago

    To address Jennifer Bauer’s question of whether it can be a Constellaria sp Bryozoan, sometimes it’s not easy. Coral are holes with septa running radially from the edges of the holes towards the center. Constellaria have monticules or raised bumps that run radially from the center to away from it. This can be an optical illusion.
    Take a look at this Protaraea richmondensis from Camden Ohio. If you look at it one way, you see bryozoan monticules. If you look at it the other way, you see holes. http://www.drydredgers.org/fieldtrips/trip201410/large_marked/PA250183.jpg

    Here’s a Conularia with the same problem. http://www.drydredgers.org/fieldtrips/trip201505/large/P6040087.JPG

  • 7 months, 3 weeks ago

    As always, knowing where it was found is very helpful for correct identification. If this was found in the Cincinnatian Richmondian Stage, it looks to me like an encrusting coral called Protaraea richmondensis. For more photos of this particular species, see http://www.drydredgers.org/thumb_by_coral.htm#Protaraea
    Hope this helps.
    – – Bill

  • 2 years, 1 month ago
    Bill Heimbrock posted a new activity comment

    Hi @marie-vahue! You should first read the description of my methods in the “Curation of Curation of Personal Collections” topic. Here’s the URL – http://www.myfossil.org/forums/topic/curation-of-personal-collections-2/

    Also, Cool! You are collecting Penn Dixie Brachs! If I ever get back there to Penn Dixie in my lifetime, I’m going straight to the brachiopods. The heck with the boring trilobites. See my Dry Dredgers report on my one and only trip to Penn Dixie and the brachs I collected at http://www.drydredgers.org/fieldtrips/trip201306_penn_dixie_brachiopods.htm.
    Gotta go now. Too busy. Post a reply. Best of luck.
    Bill

    • Wow Bill! You certainly had a great day at Penn Dixie! I am excited as PD has hired a paleontologist who specializes in Brachiopods. I am sure I will be peppering her with questions!

  • You’re welcome, Hunter @hunter-thurmond. But I must point out that I’m a fellow amateur fossil collector by hobby and a computer systems analyst by trade.

    I wonder if it would be good to have the myfossil.org avatars show the amateur or professional designation under the user type “participant”? In this way we would be able to know when we are conferring with peers or collaborating with a professional. I wonder if anyone else would find that useful.

    Thoughts, @bmacfadden, @llundgren, @jkallmeyer, @lmccall, @lcone, @kcrippen?

    Bill
    Amateur Everything 🙂

  • Hi Hunter @hunter-thurmond

    You’ve asked a good question. You’ll get a wide variety of answers, most with common points.

    Generally, when you get more experienced, you’ll know what you want to keep. Until then, here are some of my thoughts.

    First a disclaimer, I’m a bit different than most collectors. I don’t have a room to display fossils, so I don’t keep fossils for that purpose. No fossil is wasted for me. I help run the classroom fossil kit distribution and sales for the Dry Dredgers. So I screen for museum-worthy fossils and bring those to the attention of the Cincinnati Geier Collections and Research Center. I’m also aware of what research our local professionals are conducting and keep an eye open for what they need. So I collaborate and donate fossils for educational purposes.

    Given that, here are my thoughts. The greatest value of fossils to you at this stage in your collecting is what you learn from them. If a fossil looks interesting to you, pick it up and examine it. If you are still interested in it, bag it and make note of where you found it. Without info on where it was found, the fossil is useless to you and everyone else.

    When you get home, examine your finds while you are still excited about them. Look up the fossil online and learn about the fossil. When you revisit the site or similar sites, you may find better specimens of the same fossil. Take them home, compare to what you found previously and perhaps even act as a scientist in your approach. If you just want to have the best fossils for an exhibit and nothing else, then consider giving the lesser specimens to others who want to learn or give them to educational institutions. NEVER put the lesser fossil back on the site or on other sites. It will corrupt the stratigraphic information.

    I do much of my fossil selection while I’m still on the site. I surface collect and the surface is just as important to me and Paleontology as the fossils on it. Put on your thinking cap while out there. Study photos of fossils in books so when you see a fossil like what you read about, you can know to pick it up and compare to the photos.

    I strongly urge you to join your local fossil club or volunteer at your local museum. This will help you get the greatest knowledge the fastest and make your time in the field much more enriching.

    After a few years, you’ll understand better what is common and what is rare and sought-after. Fragments of fossils can be just as interesting and important as whole body fossils. Trace fossils also show the behavior of the ancient animal and are at least as important as the body fossil.

    I could go on forever. Thanks for the great question, Hunter. I’ll be interested in how other people respond to this question as well.

    Bill Heimbrock
    Fossil Kit Chair and Webmaster
    Dry Dredgers
    [email protected]

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