Isaac E. Pope

  • 3 days, 10 hours ago
    Isaac E. Pope replied to the topic FOSSIL Newsletter in the forum FOSSIL Sustainability

    Thank you, @jbauer! As Jen said, I am a high school-aged geologist-in-training with a great interest in sedimentology and paleontology, which I have studied to graduate-level readings. While most of the time I am studying Quaternary geology, my ‘specialties’ in paleontology would be ichnology, diapsids, and cephalopods, although I investigate other subjects as well. I am currently studying part-time at Centralia College focusing on geology and mathematics until I can commence full-time study next year. I greatly look forward to meeting my fellow paleontology enthusiasts and learning from you all.

    Sincerely,

    Isaac Pope

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Isaac_Pope

  • 3 days, 20 hours ago
  • 4 days, 22 hours ago
    William Biesele and Isaac E. Pope are now friends
  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new activity comment

    Thanks to MacKenzie Smith (@mackenzie-smith) and his advisor Dr. Stephen Manchester for assistance with identification!

  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new specimen.

    Isaac E. Pope has contributed specimen mFeM 58527 to myFOSSIL!

  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new activity comment

    Hello @jbauer, thank you for your comment! I was just about to ask you about this specimen’s identity. Actually, I found this in a fairground parking lot and off the top of my head I thought it resembled some Oligocene brachiopods here in Washington State, but after looking more into it I doubt that it is local. I will update it and if you have any more info I greatly look forward to reading it!

    • Let me tag in @mackenzie-smith who is more familiar with PNW fossils to chime in on the potential origin. I’ve collected similar looking fossils from the Ordovician – but certainly they extend beyond that time period. Oligocene just seems a bit too far – but I’m not super familiar with brachiopods outside of the Paleozoic.

  • 1 week, 2 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope and Jennifer Bauer are now friends
  • 1 week, 2 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope and Nathan Newell are now friends
  • 1 week, 2 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new activity comment

    Thank you for pointing this out, @jbauer! I have updated the specimen as you requested.

  • 1 week, 2 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new activity comment

    Hello @jbauer, thank you for the clarification! It is unfortunate that such an interesting field lacks a comprehensive yet simple specimen classification yet, although perhaps that complexity is what makes it so interesting!

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new specimen.

    Isaac E. Pope has contributed specimen mFeM 58455 to myFOSSIL!

    • Hi, @i-edwards – are you sure this was found in Oligocene rocks? It looks very similar to other brachiopods I have found that went extinct in the Permian, namely Lepidocyclus and Hiscobeccus. PBDB is suggesting maybe there are some Oligocene occurrences: http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=86574 but it jumps from the Devonian to the Oligocene, which seems unreasonable to me. Let me know what you think, Jen

      • Hello @jbauer, thank you for your comment! I was just about to ask you about this specimen’s identity. Actually, I found this in a fairground parking lot and off the top of my head I thought it resembled some Oligocene brachiopods here in Washington State, but after looking more into it I doubt that it is local. I will update it and if you have any more info I greatly look forward to reading it!

        • Let me tag in @mackenzie-smith who is more familiar with PNW fossils to chime in on the potential origin. I’ve collected similar looking fossils from the Ordovician – but certainly they extend beyond that time period. Oligocene just seems a bit too far – but I’m not super familiar with brachiopods outside of the Paleozoic.

      • @jbauer and @i-edwards Get ready for a long answer! WA has rocks from almost every period in the Phanerozoic. The PBDB also has a lot of omissions from PNW fossils since many of the original collections were USGS, have been lost or were never cataloged into PBDB. So it would not surprise me if this was an Oligocene occurrence that is not it PBDB. Likewise, it wouldn’t surprise me if it was older. Furthermore, Rhynchonellida (the order this fossil belongs to) extends into the present day and perhaps this could be a different genus. There are living braciopods in Friday Harbor (near Seattle) and three species of braciopods from the Miocene of Oregon (two are in Terebratulida though and the rhynchonellid surprisingly lacks the ribbing that most rhynchonellids have). Where this is from a fairground though it is also very likely that this was a bought or given away at a rock, mineral and gem show and then lost so the original locality and time is unknown.

        • Yay! I love long answers! Thanks, @mackenzie-smith. I figured there was a lot of information ‘missing’ from all the online databases in terms of specimens & lithologic information.

          From what I remember the strong ribbing decreases through time – which was the first big trigger for me that maybe something was a bit off. I can try to track down an image of the Italian Oligocene specimens!

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new activity comment

    Thank you, @sadie-mills and @jbauer for your comments! Unfortunately, classifying ichnossils simply can be so difficult because of the different system it uses! It emphasizes ethology over bauplan because rarely do we exactly know what the producer is (one of the founding principles of ichnology). I think that Kingdon Animalia > Phylum Ichnofossils would work just fine, although as an ichnology student I would appreciate more information such as on the ichnofacies and sedimentary petrology (for example, this specimen has a sandstone lithology). If we wanted to add more technical information, I would recommend having an intermediate page in the New Specimen system that gives the option to select for either the “body fossil” or “ichnofossil” taxonomy, which would provide a separate and equally detailed information sheet for trace fossils. On the other hand, who would bother about ichnofacies but an ichnologist like me! 🙂 Just some ideas.

    • Hi, @i-edwards – I have taken a few ichnology courses and appreciate your sentiment but the issue is with the underlying structure of the data – which is a global standard. We can add fields as we like but I’m not sure a separate standard exists for ichnotaxa. I can chat with some colleagues about it at GSA.

      We *do* have a Field Notes section where you can absolutely include information on the ichnofacies and sedimentary petrology or outcrop details and this *will* be attached to your specimen occurrence data.

      • Hello @jbauer, thank you for the clarification! It is unfortunate that such an interesting field lacks a comprehensive yet simple specimen classification yet, although perhaps that complexity is what makes it so interesting!

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new specimen.

    Isaac E. Pope has contributed specimen mFeM 58448 to myFOSSIL!

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted an update in the group What is it?

    @mackenzie-smith, here are some photographs from differing angles. A thin veneer of the original white matrix remains cemented on the specimen; the final image is a cross section across the radius.Thank you for your help!









    • Hi @i-edwards! My advisor and I were talking about your fossil. Because there appears to be one type of cell we think it’s conifer wood. Conifers just have tracheids cells but the vast majority of flowering plants have tracheids and vessels which are round and larger. Sadly, conifer is the best we could do. We also think that it’s possible that if this was found by the Yellowstone River this piece was transported from an Eocene deposit.

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new activity comment

    I agree, the more we learn of graptolites, the more marvelous they become! I look forward to seeing your own identification of the specimens; I am still just learning but I am attempting to become more active on here to help grow my general paleontological knowledge

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new activity comment

    Thank you for your help, @mackenzie-smith! I will certainly post pictures from alternative positions.

  • 1 week, 4 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted an update in the group Vacation Explorers

    Glendive, Montana, has so much petrified wood that they use it as yard decoration!



  • 1 week, 4 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted an update in the group What is it?

    A specimen of what appears to be petrified wood collected along with numerous other petrified wood specimens (such as this small specimen: https://www.myfossil.org/dwc-specimen/58411/) in a fluvial deposit near Glendive, Montana. @mackenzie-smith, could you please identify the type of wood this is?






    • I can confirm this is wood and it appears to be a longitudinal or radial section. The cells are relatively short (2-3 times tall as they are wide) and have very thick walls which is hopefully good for ID. Is it possible to get a photo from the third side? Our resident petrified wood person is at a conference right now but should be back later this week. Thanks!

    • Thank you for your help, @mackenzie-smith! I will certainly post pictures from alternative positions.

  • 1 week, 4 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted a new specimen.

    Isaac E. Pope has contributed specimen mFeM 58411 to myFOSSIL!

    • Hi, @i-edwards – Would you update the Kingdom to be Plantae? We will soon implement a filtering feature that will use the classification to sort the specimens so having even ‘Plantae’ will help others see your specimen. Talk to you soon, Jen

  • 1 week, 4 days ago
    Isaac E. Pope posted an update in the group Paleo Pics

    Today we were practicing some photography on both fossil and rock specimens alike. Please feel free share experiences and advice on future photographic endeavors, and – most of all – enjoy!

    Camera: Canon EOS T6i with a EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens

    Descriptions:

    1. Cleoniceras ammonite from a local rock shop
    2. Interlocking quartz crystals
    3. Banded-chert (chemical sedimentary rock composed of cryptocrystalline silicate)
    4. Close-up of the second (quartz crystal) specimen











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