• Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 6 months, 2 weeks ago

    6 months, 2 weeks ago
    6 months, 2 weeks ago

    Hi @dominik-niehaus, big fossil oysters are a hard group sometimes! The best match I can find in the literature from the Eocene-Oligocene of Eckelsheim is Pycnodonte (Crenostrea) callifera, which is about the right size and shape, although the shell is less vesicular than I would expect from a pycnodontine and I can’t make out any chomata. I would…[Read more]

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 9 months ago

    9 months ago
    9 months ago

    The ID listed seems likely to me

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 9 months ago

    9 months ago
    9 months ago

    Also looks fine! I’m not exactly an expert on the US Neogene, though, so I’m unclear on why the Paleobiology dept of USF need me to double-check their IDs? I’m sure they have better access to comparative specimens and literature than I do.

    • Thank you Katie! This is a very good point and I’ll tag you less with these IDs.

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 9 months ago

    9 months ago
    9 months ago

    Looks fine to me. Would it be at all possible to get specimen photos rotated to standard, hinge-at-top orientation before posting? I know it seems like a niggly little thing but it really helps facilitate ID checks and comparisons if I don’t have to twist my neck around trying to look at it the ‘right’ way up!

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 9 months ago

    9 months ago
    9 months ago

    It’s definitely a Plicatula! Nice specimen, @hunter-Thurmond 🙂 One further photography tip: bivalves are usually illustrated with the hinge at the top (i.e. 180 degrees to how you have your first and third photos here), and it helps to compare to published illustrations for ID checking if everything is the same way up.

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 9 months ago

    9 months ago
    9 months ago

    It’s definitely a Plicatula! Nice specimen, @hunter-Thurmond 🙂 One further photography tip: bivalves are usually illustrated with the hinge at the top (i.e. 180 degrees to how you have your first and third photos here), and it helps to compare to published illustrations for ID checking if everything is the same way up.

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 9 months, 4 weeks ago

    9 months, 4 weeks ago
    9 months, 4 weeks ago

    Hi @usf-paleobiology I can’t seem to reply directly to your comment! I would contact Roger Portell to start with, he would be able to tell you who to go to from there. I don’t see any reason you should take the specimen down, but definitely change the taxonomy listed so it doesn’t say Scaphella floridana: this really isn’t a Scaphella! Here’s an…[Read more]

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 10 months ago

    10 months ago
    10 months ago

    Having conferred with a colleague, we think this is certainly not Calloosahatchee formation, and probably not fossil. It’s a turbinid gastropod, but neither of us is familiar enough with the modern USA fauna to ID further. I would send pics to the Florida Natural History Museum: they have the expertise to do a proper ID.

    • Thank you so much!

    • Thank you so much! Would you like me to take this specimen down or can you suggest who I should contact at FNHM for identification?

    • Hi @usf-paleobiology I can’t seem to reply directly to your comment! I would contact Roger Portell to start with, he would be able to tell you who to go to from there. I don’t see any reason you should take the specimen down, but definitely change the taxonomy listed so it doesn’t say Scaphella floridana: this really isn’t a Scaphella! Here’s an…[Read more]

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 10 months ago

    10 months ago
    10 months ago

    That’s not a volute, it looks more like a turbinid or other trochoid thing. I’m gonna go see if I can find some info on what’s lurking in the Caloosahatchee that might fit better. Stand by! ETA: should have said this earlier but the preservation doesn’t match what I’ve seen out of the Caloosahatchee either – that preservation of colour patterning…[Read more]

    • Thank you!

      • Having conferred with a colleague, we think this is certainly not Calloosahatchee formation, and probably not fossil. It’s a turbinid gastropod, but neither of us is familiar enough with the modern USA fauna to ID further. I would send pics to the Florida Natural History Museum: they have the expertise to do a proper ID.

        • Thank you so much!

        • Thank you so much! Would you like me to take this specimen down or can you suggest who I should contact at FNHM for identification?

        • Hi @usf-paleobiology I can’t seem to reply directly to your comment! I would contact Roger Portell to start with, he would be able to tell you who to go to from there. I don’t see any reason you should take the specimen down, but definitely change the taxonomy listed so it doesn’t say Scaphella floridana: this really isn’t a Scaphella! Here’s an…[Read more]

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 10 months, 2 weeks ago

    10 months, 2 weeks ago
    10 months, 2 weeks ago

    This is an arcid bivalve, probably a species of Anadara. Any idea where it came from or how old it is? Is it from Florida? If you can fill in any details of stratigraphy and geography, then narrowing down the ID will be easier.

  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 11 months, 1 week ago

    11 months, 1 week ago
    11 months, 1 week ago

    I can’t give you a firm ID on this, sorry – it’s quite worn (this happens often to scallops, they quite like clean fast water which means they come into contact with hard debris not uncommonly – including each other’s shells!) so it’s also lost the details of its auricles, resilifer, and things like whether or not it had a byssal notch and…[Read more]

  • Katie Collins changed their profile picture 11 months, 1 week ago

    11 months, 1 week ago
    11 months, 1 week ago
  • Katie Collins posted a new activity comment 11 months, 1 week ago

    11 months, 1 week ago
    11 months, 1 week ago

    Hi @delwin-glasner, I think your specimen is a Cubitostrea, probably C. lisbonensis. It looks like it’s either very worn or it’s been coated in glue or varnish, which is obscuring some of the nature of the sculpture, but comparing the literature I can find on the fauna of the Cane River formation to your specimen, that would be my best suggestion.

  • Katie Collins became a registered member 11 months, 1 week ago

    11 months, 1 week ago
    11 months, 1 week ago