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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 97 total)
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  • #99606
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hi Patricia! This is a Sheepshead fish tooth. The genus is Archosargus.

    #96472
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hi Bill,

    I know both Jorge and Austin, and I agree with their comments. It seems you’ve found some fossil whale bone, but unfortunately it also seems to be pretty heavily weathered. I cannot confirm which bone(s) you have or the species.

    Cetaceans are known from the Towsley Formation. A skull was described in a paper by Barnes in 1977, “Outline of Eastern North Pacific Fossil Cetacean Assemblages”

    Best,

    Victor

    #96075
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    My best guess is that you found some echinoid (sea urchin) impressions in a chert nodule.

    #88477
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Very cool find! <span class=”atwho-inserted” contenteditable=”false” data-atwho-at-query=”@mackenzie”>@mackenzie-smith</span> may be able to help with this.

    #86218
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hi <span class=”atwho-inserted” contenteditable=”false” data-atwho-at-query=”@james-e”>@james-ellsworth</span>, I see what you are referring to now. I have certainly taken note of this feature before and I know others have as well; however, as far as I know, no one has really provided an explanation for this feature and I don’t think there is any official scientific terminology for it either. I suppose the slight hook shape could aid in anchoring the root within the jaw. I wish I had more answers for you, but this one still remains a mystery.

    #84259
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    No problem, thank you for sharing your find!

    #84257
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hi Amber, I’m still confident that this isn’t bone. If you are interested in searching for fossils, this may be a fun place to check out https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/ancient_fossils_bring_coastal_tourism_opportunities_to_life_in_michigan

    #84154
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hi Amber, this does have an odd shape, but it is not a fossil. It’s likely either sandstone or ironstone that has been weathered into this peculiar shape by water flowing through it. Bone has a very distinctive porosity, which this lacks. I hope this helps!

    #81599
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hi Kelly, this looks like an impression of a fossil plant called a lycopod. Could you add another photo with a scale? @mackenzie-smith should be able to confirm.

    #73542
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    As far as I can tell, it is not a fossil

    #72668
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    William is correct, this is half of a modern walnut seed, not a fossil.

    #72432
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Natural formation from water erosion. Very unlikely you will be able to see fossil remains from Google Earth images.

    #71415
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Unfortunately, I do not think this is a fossil, but it is an interesting rock. The ends seem to be layers of calcite crystals, with perhaps a carbonate mudstone in between. The odd shape would be a result of differential weathering between the calcite and the mudstone.

    #65512
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hi Rene, this is from an invertebrate. It’s either the part of a hinge of a clam or part of the feeding apparatus (called aristotle’s lantern) of a sea urchin. I’m sure with some photos from different angles, we could say which of the two it is.


    @jbauer
    do you agree / can you tell which it is?

    #63219
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    I’m sorry I don’t really understand what you are asking. I don’t know what “authorities” you are worried about, but I cannot tell you about the legality of what you found from any photo or video. You may have to bring it to a museum and speak to someone in person.

    #63217
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    My assumption is that it is not a fossil, but there really is no way I can confirm that from a photo. There’s no scale bar in your photo, but it appears that the bone is too small to be from a hominid (human or neanderthal).

    #63212
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Does look like a tibia, but I can’t tell if it is a fossil or modern from the photo. Does it feel very dense or light?

    #62325
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hard to tell from the photo, but might be a fragment of a scallop shell.

    #56551
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    That’s interesting. I was wondering if it could be an ostracod, but I can’t find any that really match what you’ve got. @laura-cotton @mackenzie-smith any ideas on this? I think it is from a lower cretaceous freshwater site in Texas.

    #56325
    Victor Perez
    Participant

    Hey Scott!

    This site may offer some additional help https://www.fossilguy.com/sites/sharktooth-hill/index.htm

    The site operator, Jayson, was one of the guys out at the quarry with me when we met. I think he plans on updating this page with some of his new finds from this past trip as well. @jayson-kowinsky

     

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 97 total)