MacKenzie Smith

  • 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    That’s a very nice specimen! Do you know where it’s from? Not to be that one person, but I will say it’s a cone and not a fruit. Araucaria is a conifer, like pines, and thus lack an ovary to develop fruit and instead have “naked” seeds. Their cones look very different from pine cones since they aren’t pines and have a superficial resemblance to some tropical aggregate fruits like Annona so I see the confusion.

  • 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith joined the group NAPC
  • 1 week, 6 days ago
    John Stec and MacKenzie Smith are now friends
  • 2 weeks ago

    Hi @john-stec Nice to meet you.

  • 2 weeks, 6 days ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    Hey there @d-n! Can you give me a little more information (where it’s from and if you know the age)? That could help. At the moment it’s hard for me to tell if I’m looking at a rock or a fossil.

  • 2 weeks, 6 days ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    😯

  • 2 weeks, 6 days ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    Thanks for sharing this video Jack!

    • Sure! This is the first time I have seen color patterns show up with UV but these are fairly recent fossils – Pliocene I believe. I have gone somewhat nuts on fluorescent minerals and stumbled on this on one of the sites I check for that phenomena. Many of our fossils have some degree of fluorescence – usually the calcite which gives an orange glow under UV. A certain percentage of manganese and lead impurities within the calcite produce the fluorescence. Some fossils from the west can have a green fluorescence that is caused by a uranium oxide ion impurity. Also, some fluorescent fossils will phosphoresce after the UV is turned off. I have some Ordovician stromatoporoid fossils that do that.

  • 3 weeks ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new specimen in the group Eclectic Echinodermata from the myFOSSIL app

    MacKenzie Smith has contributed a new specimen to myFOSSIL!

  • 4 weeks, 1 day ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted an image in the group Paleo Pics from the myFOSSIL app

    This is a bisaccate grain. The two blobs on top are called sacci and are filled with air making it easier for the pollen to be dispersed by wind. It sort of looks like Mickey Mouse right? Today there are only two families that have bisaccate grains (both are conifers). The Podocarpaceae which is native to only the Southern Hemisphere today and the Pinaceae which includes the pines. #fossil

  • 4 weeks, 1 day ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted an image in the group Paleo Pics from the myFOSSIL app

    This is another 44 million year old pollen fossil but a different site in Oregon. It is triculpate (three slit openings) but to me what makes it interesting are the fossa, large divits in the grain wall. These are original (not caused by taphonomic processes or deformation caused by processing the material). Don’t know what it is though. #fossil

  • 1 month ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new specimen in the group Florida’s Fossils from the myFOSSIL app

    MacKenzie Smith has contributed a new specimen to myFOSSIL!

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted an update in the group Education and Outreach from the myFOSSIL app

    Do you like mammoths? Do you like large Pleistocene animals? Well, we have the video for you! Happy Friday and enjoy https://youtu.be/2MPfgGvEGYo.

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    Hi there! Potatoes are very young evolutionarily (like less than the past 50 million years, ie after the non-avian dinosaurs) and the rocks in that part of KY are several hundred million years old (older than the oldest dinosaurs and before any flowering plants). I’ve definitely seen blogs dedicated to “potato fossils” but the reality is these are just rocks that look like potatoes. When we cut them they have a crystal structure that is non-biological. I mention this purely because I’ve seen false information circulating online.

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    Hi @suzanne-laytham! This is probably a rugose coral (horn corral). These fossils probably predate any vertebrates with large claws. This is also a marine environment so we’re more likely to find marine organisms.

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    Hi there! I think this might just be a rock. I’m not seeing anything that jumps out to me as this being a fossil. Sorry!

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    😍🤣

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted an image in the group Paleo Pics from the myFOSSIL app

    Fossil fungus spore!!!! Notice how this is a chain of 4 cells and not a grain with openings? That is one way to tell that this is not pollen. #fossil

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted an image in the group Paleo Pics from the myFOSSIL app

    This grain has a verniform (wormy) sculpture (sculpture is what we call the texture). Sort of looks like brain coral right? One modern family that has pores and verniform sculpture is the Ulmaceae, or elm family. Because we also have elm family leaves at this site and it matches these morphological traits there is a strong possibility that that is what this could be. #fossil

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted an image in the group Paleo Pics from the myFOSSIL app

    This pollen grain has three pores making it triporate. You may also notice that you can see the full pores meaning they are not on the grain’s equator. We would call this subequitorial. #fossil

  • 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    MacKenzie Smith posted a new activity comment

    I agree with @cassie-pendry. It’s definitely a brachiopod (lamp shell) and it’s in the order Strophomenida. That half-oval shape with thin ridges is typical for that group.

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