Sadie Mills

  • 1 day, 7 hours ago
    Sadie Mills posted an image in the group What is it? from the myFOSSIL app

    If I found a living one I would call it a Moon Snail, any ideas if the fossil one goes by the same name? #fossil

  • 2 days, 8 hours ago
    Sadie Mills posted an image in the group Paleo Pics from the myFOSSIL app

    Tiny fossils are my favorite! These were found in the Nebraska Badlands last summer. #fossil

  • 2 days, 8 hours ago
    Sadie Mills posted a new activity comment

    Where did you find them? Location can help narrow down the possibilities!

  • 3 days, 8 hours ago
    Sadie Mills posted an image in the group Paleoart Appreciation from the myFOSSIL app

    I love the National Fossil Day art this year! Ground sloths are just the coolest, and it celebrates the 100th anniversary of Grand Canyon National Park! #event

  • 1 week ago
    Sadie Mills and Dominic L. are now friends
  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Sadie Mills and Mitchell Moore are now friends
  • 1 week, 2 days ago
    Sadie Mills posted a new activity comment

    Oysters! They are builders, water cleaners, erosion protectors, and so much more!

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Sadie Mills and Teddy Reeves are now friends
  • 1 week, 4 days ago
    Sadie Mills updated their own Fossil #047248
  • 1 week, 4 days ago

    A new fossil has been added. Thank you for contributing!

  • 1 week, 5 days ago
    Sadie Mills and Megha Mahapatra are now friends
  • 2 weeks ago
    Sadie Mills and Sheila Potter are now friends
  • 2 weeks, 1 day ago
    Sadie Mills and Sophie Hyatt are now friends
  • 2 weeks, 2 days ago
    Sadie Mills and Rose Alexander are now friends
  • 2 weeks, 2 days ago
    Sadie Mills and Heather Aziz are now friends
  • 2 weeks, 3 days ago
    Sadie Mills and Keegan Kuhn are now friends
  • 2 weeks, 4 days ago
    Sadie Mills posted an update in the group Shocking Shark Teeth

    Question for all the shark tooth people out there: when a broken tooth is found, can you tell if it broke before fossilization or after? Is one scenario more likely than the other? Thanks for any input!

    @vperez @jeanette-pirlo

    • I would say in some cases you can tell, but more likely than not I think the assumption is that it broke after it fossilized. If you find the tooth still embedded in the original deposit and it’s broken, then it likely broke before fossilization. Sometimes there is evidence of bite marks on a tooth or feeding damage, which suggests the break happened before fossilization. If you find the tooth on a beach or in a river, it’s more difficult to be certain. If the tooth is really worn down, this likely happened after fossilization due to being transported by water (either on a beach or in a river).

    • Examining under magnification the surface of failed mechanical parts gives a pretty good idea of when and how the break occurred (brittle, ductile, fatigue, etc). This has been developed by looking at parts where you know how they failed. I would expect the same could be done with fossil shark teeth. Sacrifice a fossil tooth and a modern shark tooth by breaking them and use for comparison with future finds.

  • 2 weeks, 4 days ago
    Sadie Mills posted an image in the group Paleo Pics from the myFOSSIL app

    This Petoskey stone is fossilized coral from the genus hexagonaria. The “hex” part comes from the 6-sided chambers that make up the colony. It is around 350 million years old, making it my oldest fossil! #fossil

    • The stone that started it all for me as a little girl growing up in Michigan

    • love this stone, I used to live in Michigan and went and picked them up all the time. It’s really touristy now though if you don’t get there early in the season.

  • 2 weeks, 5 days ago
    Sadie Mills posted an image in the group Eclectic Echinodermata from the myFOSSIL app

    This cute little fossil was just given to me by a family friend. No locality data, but it says “blastoid” on the box. Is that correct? #fossil

  • 2 weeks, 5 days ago
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