Field Work Photos

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  • #3439

    Eleanor Gardner
    Keymaster

    To start things off, here are a couple shots of me doing field work at a site in The Bahamas. In the first photo, I am pictured screen-washing sediment for small vertebrate material. In the second picture, I am examining disarticulated avian skeletal material preserved inside a cave. One of my favorite field experiences!

    Looking forward to seeing others’ pictures! Do you have any “field selfies” you’d like to share?
    @jkallmeyer, @vperez, @joyce-drakeford, @mary-harbison, @cferrara, @lmccall, @michael-reagin, @msmith, @llundgren, @john-christian, @tbellos, @bdattilo, @taorminalepore

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    #3442

    Joyce Drakeford
    Participant

    Hoping these photos load!

    Aurora, NC

    Kayaking to fossil hunt in Westmoreland state park a few years ago.

    Me and my friends that went out hookah diving on the Edisto River in SC a couple years ago.

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    #3447

    Lisa Lundgren
    Keymaster

    Love the caving one, @egardner –fossil caving is something that I think I would have a challenging time doing!

    Here are a few of mine, mostly from the awesome opportunties I’ve gotten from the FOSSIL Project.

    1. Working in the Chadronian Formation in Nebraska in August 2015 with FOSSIL/PCPPire: I was REALLY excited find that!
    2. Hanging out at the Calvert Cliffs in May 2015, came back empty handed that day.
    3. On a FOSSIL Project/ Dallas Paleo Society field trip in Texas in October 2011. Found a lot of inverts!
    4. Field work for my masters program outside of Makoshika State Park in eastern Montana in….summer 2012, I think? Another member of the group had found some parts of a Triceratops on this slope, and we were debating the best ways to take notes about it.

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    #3452

    Michael Reagin
    Participant

    Excavating Upper Cretaceous turtle bones from the Coon Creek Formation, Union County, Mississippi circa 2013.

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    #3454

    Michael Reagin
    Participant

    Collecting fossil mollusks from the Upper Pliocene Moore House Member of the Yorktown Formation at the Lone Star quarry in Chuckatuck, Virginia in 2003.

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    #3456

    Michael Reagin
    Participant

    Collecting fossil shells and echinoids in 2001.  Upper Pliocene San Diego Formation, Pacific Beach, California.

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    #3458

    Love the photos, guys!

    Here are a couple of my faves:

    1. My first field experience in 2001, actually an archaeological dig looking at middens in Jackson Hole, Wyoming for evidence of bison bone. I was still in high school, it was a huge leap for me outside of my comfort zone, but I ended up loving it!

    2. I was a GeoCorps intern at Fossil Butte National Monument in Wyoming, the summer of 2011, during my Master’s program. Got to run their fossil lake excavation site and document all the cool fishies and other Green River creatures. The best part by far was helping kids and other visitors who made the hike up to the site and got to record their own fossil data for NPS posterity.

    3. Annnd here’s another one of me with my floppy NPS hat. Not a flat hat.

    4. 2015 in Texas, excavating for shark teeth near Midlothian in the Eagle Ford shale. I look so studious? 😀

    Weirdly I don’t have any photos of me doing field work for my undergrad or Master’s projects. Hmmm! They live on in photos of tracks and poop…

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    #3462

    Oops. Won’t let me edit, but a couple wouldn’t upload. So it goes:

    1. 2001 field work

    2. 2015 shark teeth

    3. Another 2015 shark teeth picture

    #3466

    Jack Kallmeyer
    Moderator

    Off hand I could only locate one photo of me in the field.  It’s a great shot of me working with Professor Alycia Stigall from Ohio U.  I’m removing about 25 mm of soft shale that was below a concentration of crinoids. The shale was wet screened later and yielded thousands of phosphatic microfossils.  This is a Cincinnatian Kope Formation site and this one or one like it will be part of a field trip at the June Conference in Cincinnati.

    Jack

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    #3468

    Joyce Drakeford
    Participant

    I love all the photos! I also love the variety of collecting in them all.

    #3470

    Jon Cartier
    Participant

    I do love working sites and excavating remains! Is it wrong to love preparation as much as hunting?

    October 2015 Excavating a pair of Mosasaur (one Tylosaurus Skull and one Platecarpus) found within 10 feet of each other. I am still prepping the specimens, but have included a picture or two of the progress.

     

     

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    #3475

    Jon Cartier
    Participant

    Here are a couple more pics of prep work.  The big one has teeth that measure 3″ of enamel. The Platecarpus has some meaty bones and teeth too! My son nicknamed the Tylosaurus “Bubbles”. Despite my best efforts to not name him that, my friends quickly adopted the name. Therefore, following the subsequent discovery that there were two Mosasaurs mixed in with the find, the only logical name for the second smaller Mosasaur was “Tiny Bubbles”. in fact, I believe he has his own song…

    Pictured is the dig site in the Cliffside of the North Sulphur River in Texas, a picture with a pointer to what I think should be a mandible with 10 tooth tips showing in line (too much matrix to tell for sure and I have not prepped it yet). I have the right lower jaw and mandible along with most of the pre-maxilla. Lots of pieces missing. it was a disarticulated and scattered find. Same for Tiny Bubbles. Some pieces were mixed together making it confusing until I found 2 different Atlas Vert Innercentrums (see pic below of cleaned specimens). The last pic shows what I have cleaned so far from both specimens.

     

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    #3487

    Michael Reagin
    Participant

    On a 2009 Birmingham Paleontological Society fieldtrip with an arm full of Pycnodonte and Exogyra in a chalk gully exposing the Blufftown Marl member of the Demopolis Formation, Sumter County, Alabama.

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    #3598

    Michael Reagin
    Participant

    PaleoBlitz 2016

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    #3602

    Eleanor Gardner
    Keymaster

    Hi Michael! @michael-reagin

    It seems that your photo file sizes are too large for our website’s current capabilities. Can you please downsize/compress your photos? We definitely want to see them! Thanks! 🙂
    -Eleanor

    #3603

    Michael Reagin
    Participant

    These should work this time.  Field photos from the PaleoBlitz trip to Possum Creek.

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    #4024

    Julie Niederkorn
    Participant

    Wow Jon!  Great to see the photos of your adventure and the progress you have made on prepping the fossils.  What a fantastic find.  Please keep us updated.

    #4773

    Walter Stein
    Participant

    Here are a few field photos from the digs in South Dakota.

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    #4780

    Lisa Lundgren
    Keymaster

    @walter-stein Cool photos from South Dakota! It looks a lot like eastern Montana, where I did a week’s worth of fossil collecting with Montana State for one of my masters’ classes. I love it out there! I’m curious–what’s going on in the 5th picture (Screen-Shot-2016-05-15-at-1.32.50-AM.png)? What you’re sitting in front of sort of looks like a skeleton of a sluice box, similar to what I’ve seen use for gold panning? And are you marking coordinates in the field book?

    #4905

    Walter Stein
    Participant

    Hey Lisa! Western SD isn’t much different than eastern MT. I didn’t know you went to Montana State.  I love it out there too. My field season is about to start. We have a few more things to clear up here, then we are off to SD in about 2 weeks. I am usually out there by now, but so much still to do here in FL. You will have to come out for a visit next time you head west.

    In the 5th picture you can see the remains of a dry screen “sluice” if you will. This was originally constructed by the landowner twenty years ago when they discovered the deposit and began doing some digging. We used it for the first couple years as a stand for our dry screening boxes, but now we have moved further into the hill and use a different dry screen technique so do not use it much anymore. It basically marks the position of the quarry when we started 10 years ago. Yes… this is me logging and mapping the specimens. We have recovered well over 2ooo bones,microfossils and teeth from the small area. Much of them theropod teeth.. hence the name “Tooth Draw Quarry”.

     

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