Jack Kallmeyer

  • 18 hours, 41 minutes ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    At first glance I thought I had this. There is an Eyewitness book that looks remarkably like this but with different authors and a different subtitle that I have. We’re saving that for our granddaughter. My first fossil book was the original Ohio Fossils by La Rocque and Marple, 1955 – not to be confused with the recent Fossils of Ohio.

  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Yes, some certainly do. This is a Platycrinities species. The individual stem ossicles are oval and have a ridge running the long direction that is offset from the actual longest dimension of the oval. When they stack up this gives the twisted appearance. This fulcrum also allows the stem to flex.

  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Nathan These all appear to molds to crinoid stems. Your skin is the mold of the external ornamentation of the stem.

  • 1 week, 5 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    @jbauer Congratulations. It’s always good when you can find a valuable source like that. The autograph makes it even better.

    • Thanks, @jkallmeyer. I agree, the personal note and really nice contact with Brad Macurda really made me feel good about myself and my work. He has been really supportive and fun to chat blastoids with.

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Bill,

    I looked at the Ohio Geological Survey VII and there are quite a few Rhytimya sp. I think you are correct with your ID. Thanks. Dalve 1948 is not illustrated. What publication and year is the Pope reference?

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Cincinnatian Collectors

    Here’s another set of pelecypods to check into.  Caritodens demissa is one of the few that have shell preservation rather than being internal molds.  This group shows “babies” under 5mm across the shells.



  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    I hated this site when I first collected it – found nothing. On my next visit I started finding crinoids so I spent many trips there. I ended up collecting 9 different crinoid species from the Liberty part of this exposure plus one partial ophiuroid. I have suites of crinoids from here with at least two such suites waiting for data collection and publication. Alas, the hot crinoid zone is slumped over now so I have to content myself with looking for well preserved molluscs and trilobites. How sad.

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    This specimen comes from Causeway Road across Brookville Lake. Mollusc preservation is pretty good at the lower end of the exposure – Waynesville Fm.

    • That’s spectacular. I don’t think I’ve ever collected there!

      • I hated this site when I first collected it – found nothing. On my next visit I started finding crinoids so I spent many trips there. I ended up collecting 9 different crinoid species from the Liberty part of this exposure plus one partial ophiuroid. I have suites of crinoids from here with at least two such suites waiting for data collection and publication. Alas, the hot crinoid zone is slumped over now so I have to content myself with looking for well preserved molluscs and trilobites. How sad.

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Cincinnatian Collectors

    I usually only keep pelecypod fossils that are well preserved.  Here in the Cincinnatian most have no shell preservation and are only internal molds.  These molds are subject to deterioration and poor preservation such that some no longer look like pelecypods at all.  This attached is an exceptional specimen about 50 mm long.  This is an internal mold with the external shell morphology over printed on it – the ridges on the right.  Note the muscle scar on the left corner.  The black coating is a carbon preservation of the original periostracum layer.  Also note that I am not good at ID for these  so no name…



    • That is an excellent find and extraordinarily preserved! I have a few nicely preserved specimens from near Flemingsburg – where is yours from?

      • This specimen comes from Causeway Road across Brookville Lake. Mollusc preservation is pretty good at the lower end of the exposure – Waynesville Fm.

        • That’s spectacular. I don’t think I’ve ever collected there!

          • I hated this site when I first collected it – found nothing. On my next visit I started finding crinoids so I spent many trips there. I ended up collecting 9 different crinoid species from the Liberty part of this exposure plus one partial ophiuroid. I have suites of crinoids from here with at least two such suites waiting for data collection and publication. Alas, the hot crinoid zone is slumped over now so I have to content myself with looking for well preserved molluscs and trilobites. How sad.

    • Jack, on your Causeway Road bivalve without an ID (very nice specimen BTW), I would suggest it’s Rhytimya sp. There is a similar specimen from the Fairmount pictured in “Review of Ordovician Pelecypods”, Pojeta, Plate 16, figure 10. That one is R. mickelboroughi (Whitfield). But your Waynesville or Liberty specimen is probably R. faberi (Miller), which is found in the Richmondian. Check Dalve 1948 to see if there is a picture of this species.

      • Bill,

        I looked at the Ohio Geological Survey VII and there are quite a few Rhytimya sp. I think you are correct with your ID. Thanks. Dalve 1948 is not illustrated. What publication and year is the Pope reference?

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Eclectic Echinodermata

    Here’s a crinoid collected by a Dry Dredger years ago.  It is now in my collection.  It is Eucalyptocrinites elrodi from the Silurian Waldron Shale of Indiana.  This is one of the less common species in this Formation. It is exceptional because the arms are preserved in place.  Usually the arms and the upper part of the cup are missing. Scale bar is 10mm.



    • An excellent fossil! I was working in the Yale Peabody Collections several years ago and was rummaging around looking for hidden blastoids (as one does) and found a Eucalyptocrinites identified as a blastoid! I can see the confusion, the arms being folded up so neatly look similar to the blastoid ambulacra. The way these preserve is really spectacular.

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer and Molly Selba are now friends
  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    @jbauer Did you know that the initial publication was delayed because of the plant section? Also, the brachiopod illustrations for the Cincinnatian were taken right out of the Cincinnati Fossils book.

    • I did not know that, but I’m not surprised! The plant section is quite large! I knew the brachiopod illustrations were borrowed!

  • 1 month, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Being a Dry Dredger, I have to agree that this is a good reference. And, if you ignore the over sized section on plant fossils, the bulk of the really cool stuff is Cincinnatian!

  • 2 months ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Bookworms

    Has anyone else looked into the Great Courses videos?  I have gotten a number of them concerning both paleontology, geology, evolution, earth history, etc.  I have found them to be quite interesting.  They aren’t cheap but if you aren’t in a hurry, the title you want will go on sale for a substantial discount. My only complaint is that they are heavy on lecture with a well qualified professor presenting the material but short on visual aides.  I could do with more slides or images supporting what is being discussed with less face time of the presenter.  I’d like to see him more as a narrator/lecturer.  Anyone else have experience with these videos?

    • I have not looked into Great Courses but I have participated in a course on edx.org – it was in physics though. It looks like they don’t have a great selection for Earth History or Paleontology. The course I took was slides that were narrated over, but also with a transcript – which really helped me. Sometimes they would show the professor but he wasn’t the major element of the course. I remember seeing many more slides than his face.

  • 2 months ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Jen, your idea to start this group was a good one. It is reassuring that people are still interested in reading good books on the various aspects of paleontology.

  • 2 months ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    My stuff came from a family vacation years ago. They’re actually from Casperson (?) beach just south from Venice Beach proper. I unfortunately left my car unlocked in the excitement of getting to the beach and we got robbed. Ahhh, good times.

  • 2 months ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Florida’s Fossils

    @tim-collins  Great find!  My collecting at Venice with a Florida snow shovel yielded interesting material but no Meg teeth



    • I found mine back around 2000, so maybe the area’s been picked over? It was sticking out of a small shelf of sand that ran along the water where the waves had eaten away at the beach.

      • My stuff came from a family vacation years ago. They’re actually from Casperson (?) beach just south from Venice Beach proper. I unfortunately left my car unlocked in the excitement of getting to the beach and we got robbed. Ahhh, good times.

  • 2 months, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Very nice! How big is this?

  • 2 months, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    I’ve not collected in that area so am unfamiliar with the Formations but this does have a Kope “look” to it.

  • 2 months, 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    This one is a trace fossil called Diplocraterion. Probably from the Kope

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