Jack Kallmeyer

  • 3 days, 3 hours ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Very nice! How big is this?

  • 5 days, 17 hours ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    I’ve not collected in that area so am unfamiliar with the Formations but this does have a Kope “look” to it.

  • 5 days, 17 hours ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    This one is a trace fossil called Diplocraterion. Probably from the Kope

  • 1 week ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    @molly-selba That is really nice! How did you get the digitization of the skull in order to make the 3-D print? Is this a generic skull or a specific one? The two I showed in my photo were: La Ferrassie I (R) and Teshik Tash (L). I also have La Chapelle-aux-Saints I

  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Bone Clones has a complete Neanderthal skeleton too! If I had unlimited funds I’d have one for myself.

  • 1 week, 1 day ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    I used to work with a guy who wouldn’t need much morphing. He had heavy brow ridges and huge canine teeth. By the way, those are only two of my Bone Clones Neanderthal skulls. That is all I could fit into my display.

    • Wow! Bone Clones! That is really awesome! I keep thinking I’ll get a 3D printer one day and print all the skulls I could possibly want! Colin and I printed Homo naledi – took 20 hours!

  • 1 week, 2 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Bookworms

    Anyone else interested in paleoanthropology?  I am quite fond  of Neanderthals myself.  Here are a few books from my library on that subject.



    • Very cool! I know @molly-selba works in human evolution. The Smithsonian used to have an app that would morph your face into a few different Neanderthal species – I remember really having a good time with it!!

      • I used to work with a guy who wouldn’t need much morphing. He had heavy brow ridges and huge canine teeth. By the way, those are only two of my Bone Clones Neanderthal skulls. That is all I could fit into my display.

        • Wow! Bone Clones! That is really awesome! I keep thinking I’ll get a 3D printer one day and print all the skulls I could possibly want! Colin and I printed Homo naledi – took 20 hours!

    • Very cool! Here is a picture of my and one of my Neanderthal 3D prints: https://twitter.com/MollySelba/status/1044642383919493122

      • @molly-selba That is really nice! How did you get the digitization of the skull in order to make the 3-D print? Is this a generic skull or a specific one? The two I showed in my photo were: La Ferrassie I (R) and Teshik Tash (L). I also have La Chapelle-aux-Saints I

  • 1 week, 3 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Bookworms

    Since Victor brought up sharks, I thought I’d plug the book, Fossil Fish, Vol III of IV, published by the North Carolina Fossil Club.  This book is outstanding for the shark tooth collector (do we have any of those on myFossil???).  The plates are all color and the amount of information given is amazing to me for a club published work.  it is professional throughout.  Contact Linda McCall if you are interested @lmccall.Since I am not a full time shark tooth collector, this book made me realize why.  The differences in some teeth seem to be discernable by experts only.



    • Great recommendation, @jkallmeyer! I definitely need to work on my shark tooth identification. My current identification process: ‘does it look shark-y’ and ‘is it pointy’.

  • 2 weeks, 2 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Florida’s Fossils

    Lori, your specimen appears to be a coral as near as I can tell.  It will be preserved as calcite.  Consequently, so not use anything acid or acidic on it as it will dissolve the fossil or at least damage the surface.  If it doesn’t clean up with a toothbrush, soap and water you could try an ultrasonic cleaner with detergent.

  • 2 weeks, 5 days ago

    @rleder Hi Ronny.  I was going back through old forums and thought I’d update my previous answer about the Cincinnati Museum Center status.  The museum is open finally!   It’s been open for a month or so now.  However, they are only able to install exhibits in stages so only a few new exhibits are open (and none of the old ones).  They are revamping everything and only a few things will be as they were before the shut-down (the physical cave and ice age walk through are the same but will end up with new peripherals).  The only thing open in the natural history side is a brand new dinosaur exhibit with seven skeletons.  It’s pretty cool. The prep lab is open so visitors can see people working on fossils through a viewing window. They just opened the OMNI Max theater.  It has gone from film to digital with new screens, new audio and wider seats to fit our population 😉  The mosaics that fill the dome in the rotunda have all been cleaned one tile at a time.  This is amazing.

    I hope your new museum is coming along as well.

  • 2 weeks, 5 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Bookworms

    I have reviewed over 90 books for the Dry Dredgers bulletin since 1993 on various areas of paleontology.  The reviews can be searched by date reviewed, author, title and subject here: http://www.drydredgers.org/jacks.htm   The list is biased to my personal likes since I was buying the books myself.  I have only received a couple of free review copies over the years.

    I read many more books than I end up reviewing but this list has some really great titles.

    I’m a big fan of Stephen Jay Gould but I only reviewed one of his books.  I never felt qualified to comment on his writing.  Gould was amazing to me.  I usually tell people to keep a dictionary close by when reading his works.  He had an amazing mastery of the English language.  I was lucky enough to hear Gould speak on two occasions and had him sign a couple of my books.  Interestingly enough, he would sign his books but only ones you purchased new not used ones nor would he sign a slip of paper for just an autograph.  During the question sessions after his talks he made quick work of the inevitable creationist in the audience. A very impressive individual.

    Another bit of unsolicited advice I give people is to try to read above your level.  You will learn far more that way.  Read college texts and professional papers.  You will be amazed at how much knowledge you will gain over time.

  • 3 weeks, 3 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Bookworms

    Here’s another Piltdown reference.  A penny postcard from the American Musuem of Natural History (undated)



  • 3 weeks, 3 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    For students of the history of paleontology, Rudwick’s monumental tomes are worthwhile reading. You will need a lot of time though:

    Bursting the Limits of Time: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Revolution, 2005, 708 pp.

    Worlds Before Adam: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Reform, 2008, 614 pp

    I liked these as they not only told the story of geology/paleontology but linked everything to the history of the times. It was very interesting to see how advances in our science were linked to world history.

    • Wow! Okay, I have a few books on my list but can add these into the queue… looks like I better get a move on getting my library card.

  • 3 weeks, 3 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Yup! That’s it. With all the different species of graptolites in the Cincinnatian, this is the only one I ever seem to find.

  • 3 weeks, 3 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Bookworms

    Since we are talking about Piltdown, here are three good ones on that topic.



  • 3 weeks, 3 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted a new activity comment

    Jen,

    These were written by a “regular guy” so to speak so not a super author trying to impress everyone with vocabulary or sentence structure. They read like an adventure story.

    The toughest books I have ever waded through were those written in the 19th century where it seems the educated elite really were educated. These folks love paragraph length sentences. I have a lot of respect for modern authors who wade through these books to give us understandable books on the history of geology and paleontology – Rudwick, Rupke, Desmond. Rudwick is especially prolific.

    • That’s great to hear – I can get behind books that read like an adventure story. It makes them so much more digestible. I agree with you – the really long paragraphs written ‘properly’ are like a nightmare for me to dissect. Great to get a list of authors that have already translated the tough language for us!

      • For students of the history of paleontology, Rudwick’s monumental tomes are worthwhile reading. You will need a lot of time though:

        Bursting the Limits of Time: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Revolution, 2005, 708 pp.

        Worlds Before Adam: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Reform, 2008, 614 pp

        I liked these as they not only told the story of geology/paleontology but linked everything to the history of the times. It was very interesting to see how advances in our science were linked to world history.

        • Wow! Okay, I have a few books on my list but can add these into the queue… looks like I better get a move on getting my library card.

  • 3 weeks, 3 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Bookworms

    How about some cool old books?  Three by Roy Chapman Andrews – the original Indiana Jones.  On the Trail of Ancient Man , 1926 is about the Central Asiatic Expeditions.  Ends of the Earth 1929 more on the Central Asiatic Expeditions. Meet Your Ancestors, 1945, “a biography of primitive man.”  This one still includes Piltdown Man as valid.  Read these adventures without the modern filters of PC.  Fascinating look into exploration by true adventurers.  



    • Very cool! The Piltdown Man story is always so shocking to me. Were these easy to get through? I tried to read Ulysses and the old English really made it difficult for me to remain focused. I got through the Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man with ease but it was infinitely shorter.

      • Jen,

        These were written by a “regular guy” so to speak so not a super author trying to impress everyone with vocabulary or sentence structure. They read like an adventure story.

        The toughest books I have ever waded through were those written in the 19th century where it seems the educated elite really were educated. These folks love paragraph length sentences. I have a lot of respect for modern authors who wade through these books to give us understandable books on the history of geology and paleontology – Rudwick, Rupke, Desmond. Rudwick is especially prolific.

        • That’s great to hear – I can get behind books that read like an adventure story. It makes them so much more digestible. I agree with you – the really long paragraphs written ‘properly’ are like a nightmare for me to dissect. Great to get a list of authors that have already translated the tough language for us!

          • For students of the history of paleontology, Rudwick’s monumental tomes are worthwhile reading. You will need a lot of time though:

            Bursting the Limits of Time: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Revolution, 2005, 708 pp.

            Worlds Before Adam: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Reform, 2008, 614 pp

            I liked these as they not only told the story of geology/paleontology but linked everything to the history of the times. It was very interesting to see how advances in our science were linked to world history.

            • Wow! Okay, I have a few books on my list but can add these into the queue… looks like I better get a move on getting my library card.

  • 3 weeks, 4 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Florida’s Fossils

    @jeanette-pirlo  You probably already know this but if not… the agatized corals you picture below fluoresce and phosphoresce under ultraviolet light.  It is more intense under longwave.  The geodized clams from Florida also fluoresce under UV.  I have quite a few specimens of the corals but haven’t found a nice geodized clam to add to my collection yet – most are fragmental or in poor shape.

     

    Jack

  • 3 weeks, 4 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Cincinnatian Collectors

    Jen,Here’s a 3D preserved Kope graptolite free of matrix.  It’s probably the same species as yours which used to be known as Climacograptus typicalis.  That has changed to some other genus but I don’t recall what the new name is.   Scale bar is 5 mm Jack



  • 3 weeks, 4 days ago
    Jack Kallmeyer posted an update in the group Eclectic Echinodermata

    I’m particularly fond of this Glyptocrinus nodosus  Kallmeyer & Ausich 2016  Scale bar is 10 mm  Jack



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